Monet’s Waterlillies Project for Toddlers

waterliliesWhen it comes to spring time art my mind turns to the Impressionists.  They were a French group of nineteenth century artists who portrayed the simplicity of everyday life in their art.  Cafe scenes, recreational life, family, and nature were the main subjects portrayed by the Impressionists.  The most well known Impressionist artist was Claude Monet who is most famous for his paintings of his garden in Giverny, France.

In his garden he had a pond with floating Waterlilies and a Japanese bridge.  He did several paintings of the Waterlilies, some were enormous painting, over 6 feet tall and several panels wide!  You can still visit and tour his home in Giverny, I haven’t but it’s on my list.  I have to go there!

To start this spring time art project with your toddler we did two freestyle paintings:  one in blue and purple for water, the other in green and pink for the lillypads. I did both of these on 9″ x 11″ card stock.  Once they dried over night, I drew and cut out lillypad shapes from the green painting for Ben.  Then he put drops of glue on the backs of the lily pad and placed them on his blue water painting.  He glued two colorful pompoms on each pad and voila!  His masterpiece was complete!img_8117

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Other Impressionist artworks worth replicating this time of year are Van Gogh’s Irises and Degas’ Ballet Dancers.  Impressionist projects can also work great in the summer months with their paintings of boats and Van Gogh’s Sunflowers.  They are very kid friendly works of art and are always popular with parents

Galaxy Homemade Slime

slimeOK if there was ever a pin for galaxy colored hands it should be with my hands in the photo! The other day I had to take Adam for his shots and I was so embarrassed after making this slime because my hands were blue, purple, and pink all over!  Now the slime did turn out really cool and it does stay nice and pliable in a airtight plastic container however the colors do mix up into a robin’s egg blue eventually.  To make the fluffy slime I used two regular bottles of Elmer’s Glue then I layered men’s shaving cream on top and added in contact solution.  I’m including photos and video below.



 




 

 

Envelope Animals

envelope-animalsThis was a simple rainy day activity.  It’s gotten to be pretty cold here in Las Vegas believe it or not. This morning it’s 39° out -i’m from Buffalo,  New York that’s cold to me. Even though it’s called the sun is out and shining and it’s a beautiful winter. It even snowed a couple days ago. So as the kids have been inside more we’ve been doing more arts and crafts activities.  The other day as I was paying bills I put some envelopes inside and took out construction paper. I cut out different shapes and show them to Ben and we talked about with the shapes were.   He repeated after me triangle an oval. Then I helped him glue them onto the back of the envelope to create years. I took out some googly eyes we glue those on to the top of the envelope to make guys. Then I added some details to create the face so he could see the animal. I told him what type of animal it is in English and in Hebrew because he’s bilingual.  Then he had fun playing with his new markers and coloring them in.  You could easily include a book like Where the Wild Things Are to this activity.  You can make a whole zoo!  It’s a really cute, fun, cheap art activity with supplies you already have around the house!

Art and Literacy Lesson: Where the Wild Things Are Masks

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Grades: PreK-2nd

#of sessions:2 50 minute sessions

Resources:Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.

Materials: 1 9″x 11″  sheet of black paper, One 9″ x 11″ white sheet of paper, a black sharpie, a pencil, crayons, scissors, a sheet of lined paper, and glue.

National Arts Standard: organize and develop artistic ideas and work.

Enduring Idea: creativity, reality and fantasy.

DBAE: art productions, aesthetics.

Cross Curicular Connection: Literacy (students respond to the text by creating a character based on the characters in the story).

Procedures: Day 1: Teacher introduces the lesson and presents the exemplar. Teacher gives an overview of the steps involved with completing the project.  Teacher reads Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak and teacher reminds students to pay close attention to the visual appearance of the monsters in the story. After the story is read teacher asks students what animals they think the monsters were based on in the story.  Teacher writes down the responses of the students on the board. The teacher says “We will brainstorm a monster using parts of animals that we are familiar with and mix them together to see what we can make. What animal parts are interesting to you like a giraffe’s neck or shark’s teeth?” The students take turns responding while the teacher writes down their answers. After a list of animal parts are compiled the teacher shows the students how to combine the parts into the drawing of a mask on the board. She that instructs the students to use the list that they came up with and draw their own unique mask in pencil on white paper. The students draw their mask on white paper in pencil and trace with black sharpie marker. Day two: the teacher reviews the steps of the lesson. The teacher reviews the story with the students and how it relates to the lesson. The teacher hands back the artwork and goes over the steps for the day. The children finish tracing with black sharpie marker their mask and begin coloring it in with crayon. When they finish coloring with crayons they cut it out and glue it onto a black piece of construction paper. On the back of their paper students can write on a sheet of lined paper what parts of animals they chose to create their monster.  Older students can name their character, they can describe the character: what it eats, where it lives, what it’s personality is like.
Rubric: /10

Student listened and participated actively in the class discussion of the character development. 1/10

Student neatly and carefully drew in pencil hey mask of the character using compiled animal parts from the list. 5/10

Students work is well crafted and neatly colored. 3/10

Student body list on the back of their project the compiled animal parts they used in their project. 1/10

Arty the Anaconda

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This is a lesson I did both in the art room and at home with Ben.  I will provide differentiated instruction based on the size of the group in this lesson.

Arty the Anaconda by Liza Amor

Grades: K-1st # of sessions (50 minutes each):2

Homeschooling: 1 media per day for as many media as you have to choose from (up to 5 or 6).  I did this project with a 2 year old, I think it is appropriate for ages 2-6.


Art Materials: for the classroom:butcher paper in a variety of colors pre-cut to represent the body of the snake on each table, glue, paper scraps (pre-torn), feathers, crayons, bingo markers, stamps and stamp pads, chalk, markers, and watercolor paint. For homeschooling: corrugated scissors or regular scissors, construction paper in a variety of colors, markers, crayons, stamps and stamp pad, bingo markers, craft materials, painting materials, and glue.

National Visual Arts Standard: Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes

Objectives: Student will-

*experiment with a variety of media.

*create a group based work of art (for the classroom).

Preparation: For the classroom:Set up one section of the butcher paper snake at each table. Set out a different media at each table. (4 tables, 4 media, 2 weeks=8 media all together)

For the homeschooler: Choose a different media per day and the appropriate color of construction paper to go with each (lighter paper for crayons, darker for tempera paint).  Set up a spot at home for the child to work with the media.

Procedure: For the classroom: Day 1: Teacher will introduce the lesson. Student will be shown and demonstrated to the various centers at each of the four tables in the art room. Student will put on a smock and rotate to the four centers using each media placed on the table. Day 2: Student will review the steps of the project.  Student will be shown and demonstrated to the various centers at each of the four tables in the art room. Student will put on a smock and rotate to the four centers using each media placed on the table.

For the homeschooler: Each day have the child try a different type of media on their construction paper.  Once the work has dried use scissors or corrugated scissor to cut out a circle.  I used a roll of tape to trace the circle before cutting it out. 

Ending: For the classroom: Display all the parts of the snake wrapping around the school building. Cut out eyes and a tongue to add to the face.  Display with state standards, national standards, and objectives.  In class discuss the materials they used, asked them what they learned and what they would do differently next time they try that media.

For the homeschooler: Put together the parts of the snake with your child.  Add a tongue from red pipecleaners and a googly eye.  Discuss the materials they used, asked them what they learned and what they would do differently next time they try that media.

Literacy/ Science tie in: Read a book about Anacondas or snakes.  Read a book about using art materials and creativity such as Too Much Glue by Jason Lefebvre or The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds.

 Rubric: /10

Student was actively engaged with each art media center. 3/10

Student treated materials appropriately (putting them away correctly and using the appropriate amounts of each material, not leaving a mess). 5/10

Student listened an followed all of the instructions of the activity/center/media. 1/10

Eight Posts for Hanukkah-Kinetic Kids Menorah

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I’m going to post this in both my blog under Hanukkah and Art Lessons for Educators and Homeschoolers which will link straight to Lesson Plans.  This time I’m not writing a full fledged lesson plan I am, however I am sharing everything you’ll need to write your own. I do have a full lesson plan on his Agamographs I will share as well.   The Kinetic Kids Menorah is based on the work of Israeli artist Yaacov Agam who founded the Kinetic art movement.  Kinetic literally mean “movement” and he is interested in creating art that looked as though it were moving.  He tricks the eye with color placement, different sizes of the same shape or object, and images that change based on where the viewer is standing.  He created Agamographs which are printed that almost look like they’re woven and depending on if you’re standing to the right or the left you’re seeing 2 different pictures.  He is highly celebrated in Israel.  He designed a fountain and a hotel in downtown Tel Aviv.  My photo of the hotel is below, but it was at night, so you can’t really see the colors clearly.

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To create the Kinetic Kids Menorah you’ll need:

*scissors

*cardstock in red, orange, gold, and two sheets of two shades of blue

*a hole puncher

*nylon filament

*glue (I used a glue gun, but Elmer’s Glue All would work too)

*a ruler

*a pencil (I used pen so you could see my work more clearly)

*optional-I had Ben free paint on white cardstock with red, orange, and yellow paint prior and used that painting for the flames.

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To start I measured out my candlesticks on the blue sheets of paper.  The piece with the slits were 2″ wide and 6″ tall with a 5″ slit.  I cut them out.  The pieces that fit inside the slits were 5″ tall.  This left a little space at the bottom for a hole to connect the candles later.

agamagam3I slid the 5″ pieces into their slits, securing with drops of glue.  Then I cut out 8 flames from Ben’s painting he had done the day before.  Side note: you can use glitter, glitter paint, regular cardstock if you want to add to the flames.  You are the artist, let your creativity shine!

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I traced around his flames onto orange cardstock 8 times and yellow 8 times.  I cut out all the flames.  The yellow ones are a bit larger to frame Ben’s and the orange ones.flame

I cut a tiny slit in each flame and the top of each candlestick, then slid the flame into the candlestick securing it with glue.

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I created a much larger flame with leftover scraps.  I punched holes in the tops of all my candlesticks and three holes in the bottom of my large flame.  I also punched one in the top of my large flame.  I strung the hook at the top of my large flame with nylon filament I picked up at Joann Fabrics and the candlesticks, alternating colors (some needed a hole punched at the bottom, but do that as you go).agam-1

This project took a couple of hours for me to create.  I would recommend it for middle aged school kids or if you’re doing one on one you could do it with a fourth or fifth grader.  I did most of the work, but Ben did contribute-so it can also be a fun decoration for the holiday including your younger child’s work.