Easy and Fun Spring Craft: Rainbow Collage

rainbow

March has just finished up and this past month’s playgroup’s theme was weather!  Boy, oh boy are we having weather!  One week I’m slathering sunscreen on my kiddos and the next I’m bundling them up with hats and sweaters.  To top it off we have sunny days, windy days, and cloudy days.  The wind can be downright dangerous here in Vegas!

Believe it or not, however, most of the rainbows I’ve seen in my life have been in Vegas- I guess it can be a lucky place!  I’ve even seen my fair share of double rainbows!

To make this collage I simply pre-cut the large cloud shape from white tagboard, and I cut out the white raindrops from the scraps.  I also cut out blue raindrops and 1 inch strips of construction paper in rainbow colors.  Ben is two and a half and would like to learn how to cut, but he isn’t ready to really cut yet.  He is fairly experienced with gluing, so I allowed him to control the glue bottle while we assembled the craft.

I started with gluing the cotton balls onto the cloud, then adding the raindrops.  I helped Ben glue the rainbow strips onto the back of the cloud for a more neat result.  At playgroup we also did a multimedia thunderstorm art work and I had pre-cut lightening bolts which another child chose to add onto their collage.  I love seeing the creativity in such young people!

This is definitely an easy and fun craft for this time of year or St. Patick’s Day.  Kids ages 2-8 would enjoy making it and older kids could cut out and even draw the shapes for themselves.  This is project could easily accompany a book about weather.  It also has a simple narrative and ties into science!  We had a lot of fun making it, and hope you will too!

Envelope Animals

envelope-animalsThis was a simple rainy day activity.  It’s gotten to be pretty cold here in Las Vegas believe it or not. This morning it’s 39° out -i’m from Buffalo,  New York that’s cold to me. Even though it’s called the sun is out and shining and it’s a beautiful winter. It even snowed a couple days ago. So as the kids have been inside more we’ve been doing more arts and crafts activities.  The other day as I was paying bills I put some envelopes inside and took out construction paper. I cut out different shapes and show them to Ben and we talked about with the shapes were.   He repeated after me triangle an oval. Then I helped him glue them onto the back of the envelope to create years. I took out some googly eyes we glue those on to the top of the envelope to make guys. Then I added some details to create the face so he could see the animal. I told him what type of animal it is in English and in Hebrew because he’s bilingual.  Then he had fun playing with his new markers and coloring them in.  You could easily include a book like Where the Wild Things Are to this activity.  You can make a whole zoo!  It’s a really cute, fun, cheap art activity with supplies you already have around the house!

Art and Literacy Lesson: Where the Wild Things Are Masks

where-the-wild-things-are
Grades: PreK-2nd

#of sessions:2 50 minute sessions

Resources:Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak.

Materials: 1 9″x 11″  sheet of black paper, One 9″ x 11″ white sheet of paper, a black sharpie, a pencil, crayons, scissors, a sheet of lined paper, and glue.

National Arts Standard: organize and develop artistic ideas and work.

Enduring Idea: creativity, reality and fantasy.

DBAE: art productions, aesthetics.

Cross Curicular Connection: Literacy (students respond to the text by creating a character based on the characters in the story).

Procedures: Day 1: Teacher introduces the lesson and presents the exemplar. Teacher gives an overview of the steps involved with completing the project.  Teacher reads Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak and teacher reminds students to pay close attention to the visual appearance of the monsters in the story. After the story is read teacher asks students what animals they think the monsters were based on in the story.  Teacher writes down the responses of the students on the board. The teacher says “We will brainstorm a monster using parts of animals that we are familiar with and mix them together to see what we can make. What animal parts are interesting to you like a giraffe’s neck or shark’s teeth?” The students take turns responding while the teacher writes down their answers. After a list of animal parts are compiled the teacher shows the students how to combine the parts into the drawing of a mask on the board. She that instructs the students to use the list that they came up with and draw their own unique mask in pencil on white paper. The students draw their mask on white paper in pencil and trace with black sharpie marker. Day two: the teacher reviews the steps of the lesson. The teacher reviews the story with the students and how it relates to the lesson. The teacher hands back the artwork and goes over the steps for the day. The children finish tracing with black sharpie marker their mask and begin coloring it in with crayon. When they finish coloring with crayons they cut it out and glue it onto a black piece of construction paper. On the back of their paper students can write on a sheet of lined paper what parts of animals they chose to create their monster.  Older students can name their character, they can describe the character: what it eats, where it lives, what it’s personality is like.
Rubric: /10

Student listened and participated actively in the class discussion of the character development. 1/10

Student neatly and carefully drew in pencil hey mask of the character using compiled animal parts from the list. 5/10

Students work is well crafted and neatly colored. 3/10

Student body list on the back of their project the compiled animal parts they used in their project. 1/10