Eight Posts for Hanukkah-Kinetic Kids Menorah

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I’m going to post this in both my blog under Hanukkah and Art Lessons for Educators and Homeschoolers which will link straight to Lesson Plans.  This time I’m not writing a full fledged lesson plan I am, however I am sharing everything you’ll need to write your own. I do have a full lesson plan on his Agamographs I will share as well.   The Kinetic Kids Menorah is based on the work of Israeli artist Yaacov Agam who founded the Kinetic art movement.  Kinetic literally mean “movement” and he is interested in creating art that looked as though it were moving.  He tricks the eye with color placement, different sizes of the same shape or object, and images that change based on where the viewer is standing.  He created Agamographs which are printed that almost look like they’re woven and depending on if you’re standing to the right or the left you’re seeing 2 different pictures.  He is highly celebrated in Israel.  He designed a fountain and a hotel in downtown Tel Aviv.  My photo of the hotel is below, but it was at night, so you can’t really see the colors clearly.

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To create the Kinetic Kids Menorah you’ll need:

*scissors

*cardstock in red, orange, gold, and two sheets of two shades of blue

*a hole puncher

*nylon filament

*glue (I used a glue gun, but Elmer’s Glue All would work too)

*a ruler

*a pencil (I used pen so you could see my work more clearly)

*optional-I had Ben free paint on white cardstock with red, orange, and yellow paint prior and used that painting for the flames.

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To start I measured out my candlesticks on the blue sheets of paper.  The piece with the slits were 2″ wide and 6″ tall with a 5″ slit.  I cut them out.  The pieces that fit inside the slits were 5″ tall.  This left a little space at the bottom for a hole to connect the candles later.

agamagam3I slid the 5″ pieces into their slits, securing with drops of glue.  Then I cut out 8 flames from Ben’s painting he had done the day before.  Side note: you can use glitter, glitter paint, regular cardstock if you want to add to the flames.  You are the artist, let your creativity shine!

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I traced around his flames onto orange cardstock 8 times and yellow 8 times.  I cut out all the flames.  The yellow ones are a bit larger to frame Ben’s and the orange ones.flame

I cut a tiny slit in each flame and the top of each candlestick, then slid the flame into the candlestick securing it with glue.

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I created a much larger flame with leftover scraps.  I punched holes in the tops of all my candlesticks and three holes in the bottom of my large flame.  I also punched one in the top of my large flame.  I strung the hook at the top of my large flame with nylon filament I picked up at Joann Fabrics and the candlesticks, alternating colors (some needed a hole punched at the bottom, but do that as you go).agam-1

This project took a couple of hours for me to create.  I would recommend it for middle aged school kids or if you’re doing one on one you could do it with a fourth or fifth grader.  I did most of the work, but Ben did contribute-so it can also be a fun decoration for the holiday including your younger child’s work.

Eight Posts for Hanukkah -Vintage Baby Block Driedels (Easy D.I.Y.)

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I picked up some vintage baby blocks when I was pregnant with Ben for a maternity shoot. It dawned on me while I was in the playroom the other day they could easily be turned into dreidels for Hanukkah and be repurposed.

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This is an easy, fun, 5 minute craft that yields great results.  I purchased the Mini Peg People at Joann Fabrics as well as the 1/4″ dowel.  I sawed off a 1″ piece from the dowel and attached it with my hot glue gun, then on the opposite end of the block I glued on a mini peg person.  Voila!  A driedel.  Ben enjoyed playing with it – a great little homemade toy or present!

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Food Safe Homemade Paint

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Adam is officially a little artist.  He was so curious watching Ben paint the last few times, I could tell he was dying to try it out.  Even though I have non toxic paint, I figured the little guy would be putting a lot of it in his mouth, so I wanted to be extra safe.  img_6704

So I scoured the internet for paint recipes, and did a little tweaking to what I found.  My final recipe is:

1/2 c. flour

1 drop of food coloring-to be added later

1/4 c. kosher salt

1 1/4 c. water

I mixed it thoroughly up in a mason jar minus the food coloring with a spoon which I used to spoon the mixture into our palette.  I added one drop of food coloring to each section of my palette and mixed with a Q-tip.img_6687img_6680

A Q-tip is a great way to manage how much paint your little is using or those tiny watercolor brushes that come in kids watercolor palettes.  I would stay away from a medium or larger size brush.  Even with a Q-tip it got messy!

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The experience was overall short, but positive.  I had to show him to dab the paint on the card stock rather than eat it.  He caught on quickly but still took the occasional taste.  This is also a great idea for cheap paint in general.  There are times we can’t afford little things like paint as moms and teachers.  I’ve run art programs on literally nothing for over 1,000 students!  It’s ideas like this that make art accessible to every child no matter what their economic background is.  I kept the leftover mixture in the mason jar over night with a little added water on top.  I made sure the top of the jar was tight.  I want to try making it in soap dispensers and keeping them in the fridge with colors ready to go.  I’ll let you know how that works out in the future.

Gyotaku Fish Printing Lesson Plan

As promised I am sharing a fully developed lesson plan with my readers who teach.  I am using basic art lesson components so you may add what you need to this lesson.

I have done this lesson many times over the years and the students really like it.  When they walk in I pretend something smells- “it smells like fish!”  Works every time to pull them in.  “It must be-because we are fish printing today!”

fullsizerender-4Gyotaku Fish Printing for 2nd-4th grade students.

3 -50 minute sessions


Art Resources:  teacher product and examples of work by Naoki Hayashi

Art Materials: 1 rubber Gyotaku fish per 2 students, 8”x11” sheets of white paper (1 per student), tempera paint,paper plates, large paintbrushes, oil pastels , glue, and white glitter.

National Art Standard Addressed in this Lesson:  Presenting (visual arts): Interpreting and sharing artistic work.

Objectives- Student will:

*become familar with the process of Gyotaku printing

*create a Gyotaku print.

*create a seascape to incorporate with the print.

*use several 2-D processes in one project.

Discipline Based Art Education: Art History and Art Production

Enduring Ideas: Humans and Nature, Life and Death, Life Cycles, Cultural Diversity.

Interdisciplinary Connections: Social Studies (can be used as part of Pacific Islander Month-May) and Science (life cycles, ocean)

Vocabulary: Gyotaku, printmaking, Japan, Pacific Ocean

.Procedure:
Day 1:
Student will view examples of Gyotaku fish prints (specifically by Naoki Hayashi).  Students will view the teacher’s exemplar and listen to the steps of the project. We will discuss how Naoki Hayashi has turned Gyotaku into an art form with his use of color and repetition.  Student will view a demonstration of the printing by the teacher and then will partner with a buddy to share paint, paint plates, fish, and paintbrushes.  Student will each print on white paper and store work for the next week. Day 2: Student will review vocabulary and art history.  Student will add ocean, sky and details to his/her fish with oil pastel. Day 3: Student will review art history and vocabulary.  Student will finish drawing his details with oil pastel.  Student will add glue where he intends to put glitter and glitter over the bucket with white glitter.  Student will store work in wire rack overnight to dry.

Rubric

Lesson Criteria- 10pts.

Criteria Excellent Great Good
Student created a Gytotaku print. -4 pts. Student created his own Gyotaku print using the appropriate amounts of paint and pressure to create an excellent impression of the fish.- 4pts. Student created his own Gyotaku print, but there are some spots of paint and parts of the fish that didn’t show up.-2.5 pts. Student did not create a successful Gyotaku print.-0 pts.
Student filled in his composition’s background with an  original oil pastel seascape. 5 pts. Student filled in  composition in oil pastel.  Student’s work is neat, balanced, and doesn’t cover up the print.  Student drew an original, realistic seascape.- 5 pts. Student filled in  composition in oil pastel.  Student needs to work on one of the following: neatness, balance, and/or not covering up the print.  Student drew an original,  realistic seascape.- 3 pts. Student filled in  composition in oil pastel.  Student needs to work on more than one of the following: neatness, balance, and/or not covering up the print.  Student drew a realistic seascape.-1 pt.
Student added touches of glitter to his composition.-2pts. Student added touches of glitter to his composition in order to enhance the appearance of the project.-2pts. Student’s work has too much glitter or a few glue drips/smudges.-1pt. Student did not attempt to be neat with the glitter and glue.  Student needs to work on choosing a place for the glitter in his composition and appropriate amounts of glue and glitter.-0pts.

 

 

 

Fall Sensory Bags-Pinterest DIY Tryout

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I saw this post on Fall Sensory Bags and tried it with My Petite Picassos Playgroup (ages 2-3) this week.  I used a Ziploc sandwich bag, hair gel from the Dollar Tree, red and yellow food dye, fake fall leaves, cinnamon sticks, and red and gold glitter. To seal them I used packaging tape.

I really like the fact the kiddos got to see the colorful leaves as we don’t have much of that here in Las Vegas.  Overall the activity went well.  I recommend only filling the bag 1/2 way with gel before adding your food coloring, glitter and fall items so it won’t be so full you can’t see through it.

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Rain Sticks

So I’m trying to play catch-up on Thanksgiving and fall crafts as I just started my blog this week. This past Friday night a friend of mine came over for Shabbat dinner. If you don’t know what Shabbat is it’s the Jewish Sabbath dinner that we have on Friday night. I cook from Wednesday to Friday a variety of Moroccan dishes as that’s my husband’s background and often times I try to invite a friend over and share in this tradition with them. I love this particular night of the week because it’s the one time a week that we as a family sit down for dinner.  My husband owns his own business and so the rest of the week it’s really touch and go as to what time he’ll come home. On Friday night we sing songs, we light candles, and we eat fresh baked bread. It’s really special and Ben loves it!  So this week my friend Man stopped by and she’s an art teacher as well. I asked her if she had any good ideas for a fall time craft as my curriculum had to have a last minute change for a playgroup this week.  She suggested rain sticks that she had been making with her art and yoga class. So I went ahead and took her advice.  My tutorial is below.


Using a hot glue gun glue a toilet paper or towel paper roll onto a piece of scrap paper.


Cut off the excess paper and roll up a piece of silver foil,stuff inside the tube.  The tinfoil slows down the rice from falling inside the rain stick.  Add some rice -just a half a handful


Glue a piece of scrap paper onto the other side making sure you’re holding your tube upwards so the rice and tinfoil don’t fall out.


Decorate with bingo markers or paint. My playgroup used bingo markers last night.  You can purchase them online my husband picked up a bunch in the casino last year.  They’re great for babies who are beginning to do art.

To finish I took a piece of yarn and some beads- strung the beads onto the yarn.  I inserted a feather into the beads and put a drop of hot glue to secure the feather inside the beads.  Then I took the two ends of the yarn wrapped it around the tube, tying them shut.  I put a couple drops of hot glue on the yarn that I had tied so it would stay in place on the tube.

This was such an easy, fun, and fast craft with the kids. They loved to shake the rain stick and hear the rice inside. It’s a great little activity for the little ones at your Thanksgiving dinner. And hardly cost any money!

Here’s a photo of all of Ben’s crafts from last night together.

Welcome!

img_5865My Petite Picassos is an idea for a blog and playgroup several friends and family members requested when I decided to take time off from work to stay home with my two sons.  My vision for this venture is to share with readers arts and crafts ideas for children ages birth through 13 years old.  My posts will include DIY ideas for stay at home moms as well as arts and crafts lessons for homeschoolers, classroom teachers, and art educators.  Lessons will include National Arts Standards, DBAE (Discipline Based Art Education) components, Enduring Ideas (meaning making), and ties to cross curricular subjects.

A little background about me: I am a Nevada Licensed Art Educator for ages 0-18.  I taught in Clark County School District for 10 years at the elementary level and won Nevada Art Educator of the Year 2014.  I was the editor for Art Educators of Nevada’s Newsletter 2013-2015 and an artist in my own right.  I was represented by City of the World Gallery, Inc. in downtown Las Vegas’ Art District for 4 years.  I am currently a stay at home mom to two wonderful little boys: Ben 2 years and 5 months old and Adam 10 months old.

I will be posting on a weekly basis and look forward to reading your comments and insights.